HMB Ballot Measures on Cannabis Regulation

Measure GG

Shall the measure, an ordinance to allow and regulate commercial, greenhouse nursery cultivation of immature cannabis plants on existing greenhouse sites in the City’s A-1 (Agricultural/Exclusive Floriculture) Zoning District for cannabis nurseries that receive a license from the City Council and comply with specified standards, be adopted?


ENDORSED BY THE san mateo Daily Journal, HALF MOON BAY REVIEW, SAN MATEO COUNTY DEMOCRATS, COASTSIDE PROGRESSIVE DEMOCRATS, AND FARMER JOHN MULLER.

Primary Argument In Favor:

According to the City of HMB, 69% of voters favored Proposition 64, which legalized a regulated cannabis industry statewide two years ago. These cannabis ballot measures are a continuation of the process to implement a local, regulated cannabis industry in alignment with the mandate of our voters from 2016.

The Coastside Cannabis Coalition supports this measure to allow and locally regulate commercial, greenhouse nursery cultivation of immature cannabis plants in existing greenhouse sites in the City’s A-1 Zoning District.

We believe that the required security, restricted access, and environmental protection measures included in state cannabis regulations already address many of the community’s concerns regarding cannabis cultivation on the coast. Since these plants do not contain THC, the cultivation of immature plants holds the least amount of perceived risk for the community. Immature plants are a smart place to start our local cannabis licensing and regulatory structure.

Passing this measure would support our local farmers and nursery operators by allowing them to get involved in cannabis related economic opportunities, which many have repeatedly asked for since Prop 64 was passed. The County has already allowed the cultivation of cannabis plants in agriculturally zoned land, and is supporting out-of-county investors in coming to properties in the HMB area to begin licensed cannabis operations. The small number of eligible cultivation facilities in HMB are owned by local families who have been contributing to our community for generations. We should not keep our neighbors and local farmers from accessing these same time sensitive opportunities. 

Additionally, passing this measure would allow our community to have local control of our cannabis regulations, so that HMB residents and coastsiders can decide what is best for our local community instead of out-of-town and out-of-county speculators.

Learn more about state regulations, public safety, security provisions, preventing youth access, environmental impact, odor/light control measures, and more on our Fear vs. Fact Sheet.


Rebuttal to Primary Argument Against:

We believe that regulating and controlling the legal cannabis industry on a local level will promote a Healthier, Safer, and Stronger Half Moon Bay.

This measure would empower our farmers to grow IMMATURE CANNABIS PLANTS ONLY - nothing that could be consumed or processed into a consumable form, without further cultivation and processing. Nothing grown could ever pose a threat to our community. This ordinance would only support Half Moon Bay’s historic agriculture community.

More importantly, as reported by the Washington Post, common-sense community regulations reduce teen use of cannabis, alcohol, tobacco, and heroin.* A more recent article concluded that “loosening cannabis laws has not led to large increases in the drug’s use among young people, and in some cases none at all.”**

Without local regulation and the opportunity for local businesses to control all aspects of our local cannabis market, our community will be subject to the whims and market conditions of those around us.

We support a local, regulated cannabis industry within the context of what is right for our unique community, in order to support our local medical patients access safe, regulated cannabis products and local farmers access economic opportunities to keep our jobs, taxes, and decision-making local.

*“Following marijuana legalization, teen drug use is down in Colorado” (Washington Post, December 11, 2017)

**”Impact of marijuana legalization in California on teens uncertain” (EdSource, January 18, 2018)

Learn more about state regulations, public safety, security provisions, preventing youth access, environmental impact, odor/light control measures, and more on our Fear vs. Fact Sheet.